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Left with nothing, no one, nowhere to go, and no one but yourself to rely on. It's a very big nowhere for these people. Dedicated to the hard-boiled world of crime in the movies, the books, television, and comics for the people who like the night life.

31st August 2012

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Reviews
Mixed feelings. They’re the worst, eh? There’s one part of you that says, “I liked this a lot” that combats the other part of you that says, “I hated this a lot” until the day both of those options die.
Maybe not as drastic. But here’s the same situation. Part of me says that The Long Goodbye was the best of the Chandler books I’ve read so far. Part of my says that it wasn’t quite up to the standards of something like The Big Sleep. Part of me says that Marlowe’s social criticism was unique and pretty cool. Part of me says that it was quite overdone in many places.
All of me says that the cop hating got a bit too much to swallow, but that sort of talk isn’t for my blog.
The Long Goodbye has the easiest to follow plot regarding one of his novels (and still, part of me is saying I had absolutely no idea what happened, especially in the last hundred pages). Marlowe helps a friend, Terry Lennox, to escape because he might have committed a crime. Marlowe doesn’t believe this, and even when Lennox commits suicide, he decides to delve deeper into the affair. Along the way, he meets Eileen Wade, a gorgeous vixen with a strange past in World War II and an even stranger way of thinking, and Roger Wade, an author who struggles with alcoholism and the perception that his crowd-pleasing drivel has led him into a rut. And also down this dangerous path, Marlowe is targeted by cops, gangsters, and the Mexican help of the Wades.
The writing is as good as ever, but followers should know that I don’t need to say that, as they probably already know.
What’s unique in here is the excessive social commentary, which some might use in consideration as to whether TLG is the best of the best or just annoying, and the character of Roger Wade as a representation of Chandler, which seems a very Fitzgerald-esque move.
Nothing else to say. Definitely worth reading, though not the best introduction into his body of work. Maybe I’ll need another run through to fully appreciate it.

Reviews

Mixed feelings. They’re the worst, eh? There’s one part of you that says, “I liked this a lot” that combats the other part of you that says, “I hated this a lot” until the day both of those options die.

Maybe not as drastic. But here’s the same situation. Part of me says that The Long Goodbye was the best of the Chandler books I’ve read so far. Part of my says that it wasn’t quite up to the standards of something like The Big Sleep. Part of me says that Marlowe’s social criticism was unique and pretty cool. Part of me says that it was quite overdone in many places.

All of me says that the cop hating got a bit too much to swallow, but that sort of talk isn’t for my blog.

The Long Goodbye has the easiest to follow plot regarding one of his novels (and still, part of me is saying I had absolutely no idea what happened, especially in the last hundred pages). Marlowe helps a friend, Terry Lennox, to escape because he might have committed a crime. Marlowe doesn’t believe this, and even when Lennox commits suicide, he decides to delve deeper into the affair. Along the way, he meets Eileen Wade, a gorgeous vixen with a strange past in World War II and an even stranger way of thinking, and Roger Wade, an author who struggles with alcoholism and the perception that his crowd-pleasing drivel has led him into a rut. And also down this dangerous path, Marlowe is targeted by cops, gangsters, and the Mexican help of the Wades.

The writing is as good as ever, but followers should know that I don’t need to say that, as they probably already know.

What’s unique in here is the excessive social commentary, which some might use in consideration as to whether TLG is the best of the best or just annoying, and the character of Roger Wade as a representation of Chandler, which seems a very Fitzgerald-esque move.

Nothing else to say. Definitely worth reading, though not the best introduction into his body of work. Maybe I’ll need another run through to fully appreciate it.

Tagged: ReviewsThe Long GoodbyeLong GoodbyeRaymond ChandlerPhilip MarlowePulpHardboiledHard boiledNoirCrimeCrime Fiction

  1. miss-grantaire reblogged this from big-nowhere and added:
    y como estamos en otoño vuelve la novela policíaca
  2. big-nowhere posted this